how to get rid of the great purists

several months ago I was sent some tapes
of a musician who had put several of
my poems to music.
he professed much interest in my
poesy.
I played the tapes on the way to the track
and back.
very classical and I am a classical music
freak
but the overall tone of the works were
I felt
tinged with the old intellectual
snobbism–the solo voices and the
general presentation.

I was both abashed and honored and that
the composer had lent so much effort and
learned musicality to my works.
at the same time I felt that the overall
effect was anti-life, anti-me, anti the
clarity of directly seeking joy, pain,
anything reasonable or
sufficient.
it was the same old con,   the same old
snobbism, the same old murderous kiss
of death clothed as a creative
act.

so I wrote the gentleman back, “you know
I have certain problems, one of them
being with instruments.
some of the instruments which I dislike
are the piano, the violin and the human
voice, especially the latter.
the human voice besides being basically
ugly also reminds me of the human
race
and one of the last things I want to
think of and one of the first things I
want to get away from when I listen to
classical music is
the human
race.
I drink for the same reason.
is it possible that you can rewrite this
whole matter
without using the above mentioned
instruments?
and, of course, please leave out the
guitar, that plaything of the most
imbecile talents…”

I haven’t heard from this composer
since.
which is part of my plan.
the other part being to antagonize,
deplete, expose and shame
the thousands of practitioners of
the arts in any of their forms
who have been subsidized by
snobbery, dullness, the willful
push toward fame
which has left us with
centuries of totally accepted
and immensely admired
works of
art
which
almost in totality
are certainly
useless,
worthless,
fake
and so supremely boring
that we think that
they must be
something.

which they are:
one of the dirtiest tricks
of our
race.

of the many
many.

Author
Charles Bukowski
Written
1991
Source
Original manuscript